Olympian Kris Freeman sets Great Adventure Challenge record

RECORD SETTER Kris Freeman, an Olympic nordic skier, pulls away in the kayak portion of the Great Adventure Challenge triathlon. (Photo by Sheila Weeman)

RECORD SETTER Kris Freeman, an Olympic nordic skier, pulls away in the kayak portion of the Great Adventure Challenge triathlon. (Photo by Sheila Weeman)

By Wayne E. Rivet

Staff Writer

When they hopped into their kayaks, pushed off the Alpine Village beachfront and paddled to the imaginary starting line on Moose Pond, Kris Freeman and Chace Conroy had very different thoughts on their mind.

Freeman, an Olympic cross-country skier, was in it to win it. The Thornton, N.H. resident had his sights clearly set on breaking the Great Adventure Challenge triathlon course record in his debut.

Conroy, meanwhile, was one of five colorful M&Ms — a spirited group of young ladies looking to make “lasting memories with best friends” while trying to conquer a challenging 3-mile paddle, 16-mile bike course and 2-mile hike up and down Pleasant Mountain.

On a hot, humid Saturday, they each put their bodies to the ultimate test.

As expected, the world-class athlete dominated the field. Freeman set a blistering pace, smashing the old record by nine minutes with a time of 1 hour, 49 minutes, 4 seconds.

“I have competed in and won the Top Notch Tri in Franconia, The Wildman Biathlon in Gorham, the Josh Billings in Great Barrington, the Sugarbush Triathlon, and the Pole Peddle Paddle in Bend, Oregon. I was looking for a new challenge and this looked like a great event,” Freeman said. “I liked the layout of the mountain bike course. It was mostly fast dirt roads, but there were just enough technical sections to keep it fun and exciting.”

THROUGH A MUD HOLE — Cyclist Candace Sabol of Orono cuts through a mud hole. (Photo by Drew Sanborn)

THROUGH A MUD HOLE — Cyclist Candace Sabol of Orono cuts through a mud hole. (Photo by Drew Sanborn)

Like most competitors, Freeman found the trek up Pleasant Mountain the least enjoyable leg of the GAC.

“Transitioning from biking to running up Shawnee (Pleasant Mountain) was a terrible feeling,” he said. “My legs did not want to move.”

The Old Guys — a team of three led by captain Jeff Fisher of Durham — also broke the two-hour mark, setting a new team record of 1:57.25.

Yet, as Race Director Rob Knowles likes to tell all competitors — the ones he has snared and have become loyal supporters of the event (that benefits Good Neighbors, Inc.) and those he hopes to entice to give it a try — the challenge is to finish, likely through plenty of sweat, cramps, possibly blood and tears, all for a very good cause.

For Chace Conroy and fellow M&M Julia Peet, it was a much longer day out on the course.

As Knowles was handing out trophies and volunteers were folding chairs and taking down tents, Peet and Conroy finally approached the finish line. Quickly, volunteers held up the “Finish” banner for the two young ladies to cross under. Their times, 4:57:39 and 5:10:26 respectively.

For most GAC triathletes, the story line was similar:

They fought through physical and mental hardship and fatigue to reach a goal and to proudly say, “I did it.”

They were exhausted, yet exuberant to cross the finish line.

They were challenged, but not broken.

They survived, they vowed to return for another bout, and they had stories to tell.

SPIRITED GROUP OF M&MS — As part of their summer festivities, friends Chace Conroy, Rosemarie Chandler, Julia Peet, Clare Conroy and Samantha Buckenmaier compete in the Great Adventure Challenge. They have taken part as a barbershop quintet with mustaches, raging princesses and this year as M&Ms. (Photo by Sheila Weeman)

SPIRITED GROUP OF M&MS — As part of their summer festivities, friends Chace Conroy, Rosemarie Chandler, Julia Peet, Clare Conroy and Samantha Buckenmaier compete in the Great Adventure Challenge. They have taken part as a barbershop quintet with mustaches, raging princesses and this year as M&Ms. (Photo by Sheila Weeman)

Why put yourself through hell?

For Chace Conroy of Washington, D.C. and her fellow M&Ms — Clare Conroy, Rosemarie Chandler of Avon, Conn., Samantha Buckenmaier of Annapolis, Md. and Julia Peet of Windham, N.H. — the Challenge is a chance to have some fun and put their friendship to the test.

“Something our team looks forward to every year is the planning and creating our costumes. As the barbershop quintet the first year and the warrior princesses last year, we decided to be the M&Ms, also known as the Mighty Mainers, this year,” said Chace as a spokeswoman for the group. “The costumes not only add another element of anticipation and fun, but they also help keep us unified and a connection on the course.”

Although each is entered as individuals, they stay together throughout the race to support each other.

“We always have a prerace huddle to remind every member of our team that our goal for the event is to have a blast and finish as a team,” Chace said.

Mike Murrin of Harrison always wanted to try a triathlon, but because he is not a strong swimmer, he wasn’t comfortable to enter some events. When he saw the GAC featured a paddle instead of a swim, Murrin signed up immediately.

“It was a combination of all the things I enjoy, but never tried to do competitively. After meeting Rob and competing in the first race, I was hooked,” said Murrin, who made his seventh GAC appearance. “Great group of people raising money for a great cause while having a great time (if pounding your body sounds like a great time to you…).”

Murrin missed just one GAC, Year 2 due to a schedule conflict.

“My goal has always been the same — have fun and finish without the need of a Med Flight!” he said. “Also watch out for the racers around you, it’s easy to get hurt out there.”

GOOD BALANCE  shown by cyclist Chad Savage of Auburn. (Photo by Sheila Weeman)

GOOD BALANCE shown by cyclist Chad Savage of Auburn. (Photo by Sheila Weeman)

Kelly Edwards of Raymond, along with her husband, Brian, competed in the GAC for the first time back in 2012.

“I was a runner with a love of recreational kayaking and my husband was a cyclist with the same love of kayaking. We discovered this race by searching for local triathlons and this is close to home and had the kayak twist. Although I was not a cyclist, I told Brian I wanted to do it. He wanted to do it, too, but said he thought I was crazy because I don’t mountain bike (I owned a 15-year-old rigid Raleigh with about 10 total miles on it). I told him that I wanted to challenge myself. That I did! Holy crap it was hard! I was in a recreational kayak, slow…, my biking skills were so bad, I had a pretty bad crash and came out with a black eye, finally made it to the run, which was a welcome respite after the biking. I finished with a total time of 3 hours and 28 minutes. My place was 78 out of 91 finishers. To both of our surprise, Brian finished third in his age group, got a great trophy and pictures with Rob. Nice!” she recalled. “The following year, I decided that I would pass on doing the race so I could be a spectator for Brian. I knew that I would never see him finish in his glory if I was out there, too. He had another great race, finishing third overall. I was proud. Then, Brian got me a new mountain bike, full suspension Scott. So I started to bike, a lot. 2014 comes up and I decide to do it again, hopefully to redeem myself from my first year. We both signed up again. I borrowed a kayak, and had my new bike. I had a good kayak leg, then got on the bike, and got passed repeatedly. I get to the turn into the wooded section and the volunteer starts cheering and saying, ‘You’re the first woman in!’ What? They must have missed someone ahead of me…But, no, really! Each new section I came to with volunteers on the course, they cheered for me as the first woman through. I finish the bike, head up the mountain to see Brian making his final descent to the finish. I cheer him on and continue to climb. I finish my ascent, climb back down to find that holy crap, I did it. I was the first woman to finish overall! Finish time of 2:33:55. Then, I realize that Brian was also the first male finisher overall. ook me all day to bring my feet back to the ground. Redeemed myself.”

TRYING TO COOL DOWN after reaching the summit of Pleasant Mountain is Chris Pingree Felts of Naples. (Rivet Photo)

TRYING TO COOL DOWN after reaching the summit of Pleasant Mountain is Chris Pingree Felts of Naples. (Rivet Photo)

Obviously, Kelly felt an obligation to defend her title this year, which she did for women 50-plus (2:40:39).

Brian Edwards’ goal was to win, but he was unable to chase down Olympian Kris Freeman.

“But, I did complete the course in my fastest time (2:11:07, fourth overall) out of four so I’m going to call it a win,” he said. “Frankly, I enjoy being able to finish near the front of the pack! That’s not usually a possibility for me, but the combination of these three events works.”

Jennifer Genovese, a fifth year GAC triathlete, was determined to beat the bike record in the 35–49 age class after being just five seconds behind the leader last year. She came up about 50 seconds short Saturday.

“I love to support such a great cause and this event incorporates all the outdoor activities I love,” she said. “I wouldn’t miss it!”

Denise Taddeo of Portland had competed in other triathlons, but was looking for a new challenge. So, she decided to try the GAC.

“I was looking for a new challenge. This event definitely delivered on that!” she said. “My primary goals were just to finish and do the paddle on my paddleboard. The organizers were very accommodating to this request. I did finish the event and managed to finish third in my age group (only five women in the 35–49 year old group though), which was unexpected. I enjoyed the scenery on all three legs of the event — great location for this type of challenge. Even as brutal as the hike was the views were amazing!”

Dr. Michael McLeod of Bridgton signed up six years ago for the first time as a goal to get into shape and complete the race.

CONQUERING THE HILL — Jennifer Genovese of Windham celebrates as she reaches the summit. (Rivet Photo)

CONQUERING THE HILL — Jennifer Genovese of Windham celebrates as she reaches the summit. (Rivet Photo)

“After four years of medical school, three years of residency and two children, I was not in very good shape. The race is always a challenge and keeps me active,” he said. “Rob has done an amazing job bringing his creation to life. It is different every year with course conditions, competitors and weather.”

McLeod enjoys the people, “The friends, new and old, that we see each year.”

And his goal? “My goal is the same each year, not to get hurt (and to beat my wife, Angela, in the race). This was my sixth and her fifth year competing. She broke a few records this year and I am very happy for her!”

Indeed. Angela set the kayak mark of 30:30 and the run in 39:30.

Act 1: The Paddle

Whether one enjoys or detests the 3-mile paddle on Moose Pond might depend upon the kayak, canoe or paddleboard one chooses to use.

“I least enjoy the kayak, mostly due to that there are so many different types of kayaks and the time is dependent mostly on the equipment. The kayaks range from 8-foot whitewater type (slowest possible choice) to the 20-foot racing boats,” Mike Murrin said. “Needless to say, if you have a racing type at your disposal you will have great time, not so much if all you have is a small recreational boat.”

Act 2: The Bike

For the M&Ms, the bike course proved to be the most challenging.

“Within the first few feet, we lost one of our teammates to dehydration and exhaustion and had to go on without her. Luckily, there was an ambulance nearby that took great care of her and responded promptly,” Chace Conroy said. “Continuing on with a smaller but nevertheless mighty group, we had to persevere through every terrain imaginable. With our fair share of blood, sweat and tears, we emerged from the brush and were welcomed by the sweet sounds of vuvuzelas played by our extended family.”

Dr. Angela McLeod also found the bike course the most challenging element of the GAC.

INTO THE FOREST is cyclist Kim Gluck of Newton, Mass. (Photo by Greg van Vliet/LakeRegionPhotography.com)

INTO THE FOREST is cyclist Kim Gluck of Newton, Mass. (Photo by Greg van Vliet/LakeRegionPhotography.com)

“I think it is the duration of the course. It is just physically exhausting to ride for 16 miles, especially after kayaking straight out for 30 minutes,” she said. “This was the first time I wore a heart rate monitor during this race and I realized that I never got my heart rate down below 175. This is not typical for me! The heat of the day also was exhausting! I think it has never been that hot in the five years that I have done this race.”

Aidan Crawford of Lovell wore a t-shirt with a slogan on the backside, “Still running strong.” It ended up being somewhat prophetic for the local 18-year-old.

His bike chain snapped at Mile 3 of the bike course. He ran with the bike for a mile to the aid station, but volunteers couldn’t repair it so Aidan asked if it was okay to leave his bike there and then run the remaining 13 miles of the 16-mile bike course — which they said he could.

“He did that (in a pretty fast time for a half marathon — around 1 hour 40 minutes) and then ran up and down Shawnee for the final leg,” his mother Blair said. “His famous last words to me before he set out on the Challenge was ‘how bad can it be!’”

Although the bike course has treacherous rock spots and tough climbs, riders find this segment a favorite.

“It was great to be neck-in-neck with clearly strong men. Smiles and fun comments back and forth. I love the woods and the trails. I’m a total convert!” Kelly Edwards said.

Act 3: The Climb

Mike Murrin knew what to expect as he started his climb up Pleasant Mountain, but it didn’t make his life any easier.

OFFERING SOME ENCOURAGEMENT as she begins her descent of Pleasant Mountain is Kelly Edwards of Raymond, the first woman overall. (Rivet Photo)

OFFERING SOME ENCOURAGEMENT as she begins her descent of Pleasant Mountain is Kelly Edwards of Raymond, the first woman overall. (Rivet Photo)

“The hike is the most challenging because you are already tired from the bike ride and the sun, humidity and temperature are at their highest,” he said. “Also getting your body to transition from biking to hiking straight uphill takes a little time and hydrating enough to avoid pulling a calf or have your quads cramp up while making sure you don’t over drink and get stomach cramps (or worse) is a delicate balance.”

The heat brought one competitor to his knees just a short distance from the top of the mountain. After a few minutes, he managed to work out leg cramps, and pushed ahead.

“2015 will be remembered in my mind as the ‘Hot’ year! Hot, Hot, Hot, especially on the trek up the mountain. Many bottles of water were poured over my head. Thought I would tank completely. Saved by the four-wheeler driving up handing out water,” Kelley Edwards said.

Jennifer Genovese added, “As you look up, it never seems to end! I just kept telling myself how close I was to the finish.”

When competitors reach the summit, they get their lanyard, which is a ticket on a string around their neck, “punched” by a race volunteer and then jog or walk around the warming hut before starting their descent.

Many felt rejuvenated as they started the return trip, partly knowing the end was near.

“I really was excited when I turned around the corner at the warming hut at the top of Shawnee Peak and knew that all I had to do was run down the hill and it was over,” Angela McLeod said. “When I had trained on the mountain earlier in the summer, the fastest I had run down the mountain was 11 minutes and that was when I was chasing my husband, Mike, and trying to catch up to him. So I knew that it would only take me 11 minutes and I would be done with the entire racecourse.”

Final thoughts

BACK FOR ANOTHER BONDING EXPERIENCE Part 2 were Tim Greszler and daughter, Megan, of Oberlin, Ohio. (Rivet Photo)

BACK FOR ANOTHER BONDING EXPERIENCE Part 2 were Tim Greszler and daughter, Megan, of Oberlin, Ohio. (Rivet Photo)

Heat and humidity took its toll on many triathletes. Knowles said he had stocked 30 cases of water and later brought in two more. Gatorade was also provided.

David Moore of Marblehead, Mass. placed 13th overall. “(My) goal was to have an injury-free day, celebrate the active outdoor lifestyle, and contribute to a good cause — I met all three, but must admit my quads are wicked sore from running downhill,” he said. “I enjoyed the banter before and after, the thrills and spills on the bike before I started going backwards with fatigue, and making the turn around the warming hut. Rob and the volunteers were exceptional as usual.”

For Angela McLeod, the heat proved to be her biggest enemy.

“The heat of the day was really too much so, although I enjoyed each and every part of the triathlon, once I finished I really felt physically ill. I think I had a combination of heat exhaustion and hypoglycemia,” said Angela McLeod, who was 29th overall and the third female overall finisher. “My goal was to make this a comeback year for my knee. So I really just wanted to do well overall and I am just thrilled with my performance!”

Last year, Angela had to compete as a team member. In March 2014, she tore her ACL and meniscus while skiing (falling, actually) at Shawnee Peak. She had surgery in April and by August was able to kayak, but not able to mountain bike or hike on the mountain.

“Although I had an awesome team and loved this aspect of the competition, I was anxious to go back to competing as an individual and see what I could do for myself,” she said. “My husband, Mike, signed us up in January and before we really got training for this year’s event, I had a significant fall on the Lions Head trail on Mount Washington this April and dislocated my shoulder. So although my knee was in good shape I was now worried about my shoulder for kayaking and biking.”

PAUSE DURING THEIR HIKE were Alissa Towle of Cumberland (left) and Genanne Brandon of Yarmouth. (Rivet Photo)

PAUSE DURING THEIR HIKE were Alissa Towle of Cumberland (left) and Genanne Brandon of Yarmouth. (Rivet Photo)

As the summer season progressed, Angela continued to train and healed well and felt confident going into the race.

“As you can see from the record results, I had a personal best and also broke the record time for kayak and hike for my age group,” she said. “I couldn’t have asked for a better comeback!”

She and others were very appreciative of the work done by Rob’s crew of volunteers, as well as the determination of the race director to be sure every little detail was covered so that triathletes had the best experience possible.

“I would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank Rob Knowles for working tirelessly to make The Great Adventure Challenge exactly that — great! I have watched it grow over the last eight years and watched Rob and his family work through the whole year to support this. They spread the word at meetings, 5Ks, make brochures, advertise in The Bridgton News, send e-mails, and update Facebook,” Angela said. “Rob has contacts that allow us to use the beach, woods, back roads, private logging trails and Shawnee Peak. There are t-shirts to print, three courses to set up, food to buy, volunteers to organize and more. And on race day, Rob works harder than any competitor for a longer duration than the last one off the mountain. All the proceeds go to help adults with developmental disabilities in the greater Bridgton community through Good Neighbors, Inc. So when asked what the best part about the race is, I reflected more and thought it’s not the kayak or the bike or the hike. The best part of this race for me is community. The GAC is in our community and for our community. For me, the other athletic events I do throughout the year are just training. This is the one with real meaning. Thanks again Rob Knowles! See ya on the mountain!”

From the Director By Rob Knowles GAC Director Benchmarks are an interesting thing. Some people focus on them and strive to attain them constantly; others just note them as they pass.    This past weekend, as Race Director of the Great Adventure Challenge triathlon, I got to check off a benchmark that I’ve had for years and only really focused on occasionally. This weekend, I helped put together a race that had a genuine Olympian and some Special Olympians competing against each other on the same course, at the same time, in the same conditions, with the same expectation — to finish and to win.  Forty years ago, I club raced motorcycles at Loudon, N.H. and in one endurance race, I competed against riders that were honing their skills and would later become world champions. Now, all I really did was try and stay out of their way while they flew past me; however, I had and still have the right to say that I competed, head-to-head, against people who were world champions.  Today, folks from Momentum, an agency in Casco that works with people that have intellectual challenges, can say that they competed, head-to-head, against a genuine Olympic athlete. Ed Rock, general manager of Shawnee Peak, and I envisioned this race 20 years ago. I still remember talking about how great it would be if the people I work with — intellectually and physically challenged — could be seen without their disabilities for at least one day; to be seen as only athletes. We decided that they should compete in this venue with no advantage or handicapping what so ever; no special divisions. If they kayaked hard enough and pedaled strongly enough and hiked/ran fast enough, they would win or place in their division.  This weekend, Kris Freeman trashed the course record of the Great Adventure Challenge at 1:49:04 and won first overall. Kris is an Olympic and national champion cross-country skier.  The Nature Trekkers from Momentum took third in the 51 to 100-age group with a time of 3:03:47. Momentum does extraordinary work with these folks. They start training in April and commit to improving constantly, just like any good athlete. So, the goal Ed and I set 20 years ago has been reached. It wasn’t a priority, but it was there and I feel good about accomplishing it. I hope that Kris comes back next year and brings some friends.  Now, not only the folks from Momentum but all those who participated in the Great Adventure Challenge Saturday can say that they competed, head-to-head, with a real Olympian, with no advantages in the same race. That ain’t bad.

From the Director
By Rob Knowles
GAC Director
Benchmarks are an interesting thing. Some people focus on them and strive to attain them constantly; others just note them as they pass.
This past weekend, as Race Director of the Great Adventure Challenge triathlon, I got to check off a benchmark that I’ve had for years and only really focused on occasionally. This weekend, I helped put together a race that had a genuine Olympian and some Special Olympians competing against each other on the same course, at the same time, in the same conditions, with the same expectation — to finish and to win.
Forty years ago, I club raced motorcycles at Loudon, N.H. and in one endurance race, I competed against riders that were honing their skills and would later become world champions. Now, all I really did was try and stay out of their way while they flew past me; however, I had and still have the right to say that I competed, head-to-head, against people who were world champions.
Today, folks from Momentum, an agency in Casco that works with people that have intellectual challenges, can say that they competed, head-to-head, against a genuine Olympic athlete.
Ed Rock, general manager of Shawnee Peak, and I envisioned this race 20 years ago. I still remember talking about how great it would be if the people I work with — intellectually and physically challenged — could be seen without their disabilities for at least one day; to be seen as only athletes. We decided that they should compete in this venue with no advantage or handicapping what so ever; no special divisions. If they kayaked hard enough and pedaled strongly enough and hiked/ran fast enough, they would win or place in their division.
This weekend, Kris Freeman trashed the course record of the Great Adventure Challenge at 1:49:04 and won first overall. Kris is an Olympic and national champion cross-country skier.
The Nature Trekkers from Momentum took third in the 51 to 100-age group with a time of 3:03:47. Momentum does extraordinary work with these folks. They start training in April and commit to improving constantly, just like any good athlete.
So, the goal Ed and I set 20 years ago has been reached. It wasn’t a priority, but it was there and I feel good about accomplishing it. I hope that Kris comes back next year and brings some friends.
Now, not only the folks from Momentum but all those who participated in the Great Adventure Challenge Saturday can say that they competed, head-to-head, with a real Olympian, with no advantages in the same race. That ain’t bad.

Kelly Edwards of Raymond added, “It's a great event for a great purpose and Rob Knowles is a personal hero to me. He and his team of volunteers go above and beyond every expectation to make sure that all participants have a great experience.”

Her success at the GAC has prompted her to take another big step. After just turning 50 years old, she decided it’s time to do a full Ironman.

“I considered doing the Mont Tremblant in Canada. When I realized the date is the same weekend as GAC and told Brian, he said, ‘Have fun in Canada, I’ll be at the Great Adventure Challenge.’ Not to worry, I’ve registered for the Ironman Lake Placid on July 24, 2016. My August weekends are open :),” she said.

Brian Edwards also saluted Rob and his crew for a job well done.

“This is my fourth year doing this event. Rob really puts his heart and soul into it. The volunteers are all great. I do quite a few events every year and this one is the most down to earth and has the friendliest people,” he said. “All the finishers are excited to share their stories from the race, it’s fun.”

For more information about the Great Adventure Challenge go to the event’s website.

Trophy Winners

Men Overall (age 17-34)

1st: Kris Freeman 1:49:04*

2nd: Nevin Rallis 2:11:33

3rd: Chris Pepter 2:16:53

Men Overall (age 35-49)

1st: John McCarthy 2:05:12

2nd: Brian Edwards 2:11:07

3rd: Thor Emory 2:12:12

Men Overall (50+)

1st: David Drew 2:19:04

2nd: Allan Lobozzo 2:24:17

3rd: Robert Beaudoin 2:42:22

Women Overall (17-34)

1st: Megan Greszler 2:52:14

2nd: Candace Sabol 2:54:12

3rd: Jodi Willey 3:16:49

Women Overall (35-49)

1st: Jennifer Genovese 2:47:15

2nd: Angela McLeod 2:49:48

3rd: Denise Taddeo 4:03:50

Women Overall (50+)

1st: Kelly Edwards 2:40:39*

2nd: Kim Gluck 2:56:40

Team Overall (combined age of 51-100)

1st: Stormin’ Norton 2:48:16

2nd: Superflies 2:52:22

3rd: Nature Trekkers 3:03:47

Team Overall (combined age of 101-150)

1st: Gents on the Move 2:16:33

2nd: Mountain Goats 2:30:50

3rd: Crew 222 2:36:40

Team Overall (combined age of 151+)

1st: The Old Guys 1:57:25*

2nd: The Gimps 2:16:49

* New records

OVERALL

  1. Kris Freeman, 1:49:04
  2. The Old Guys, 1:57:25
  3. John McCarthy, 2:05:12
  4. Brian Edwards, 2:11:07
  5. Nevin Rallis, 2:11:33
  6. Thor Emery, 2:12:12
  7. Gents on the Move, 2:16:33
  8. The Gimps, 2:16:49
  9. Chris Peter, 2:16:53
  10. David Drew, 2:19:04
  11. Allan Lobozzo, 2:24:17
  12. Mountain Goats, 2:30:50
  13. David Moore, 2:31:39
  14. Chad Savage, 2:33:45
  15. Mike McLeod, 2:34:16
  16. Crew 222, 2:36:40
  17. Greg Kolvoord, 2:37:19
  18. Tim Merchant, 2:39:55
  19. Kelly Edwards, 2:40:39
  20. Robert Beaudoin, 2:42:22
  21. Ralph Colarusso, 2:42:39
  22. Barry Towle, 2:45:10
  23. Justin Rowe, 2:45:38
  24. Mike Towle, 2:46:40
  25. Jennifer Genovese, 2:47:15
  26. Tom Tieman, 2:47:36
  27. Mike Adams, 2:47:55
  28. Stormin Norton, 2:48:16
  29. Angela McLeod, 2:49:48
  30. Jonathan Curran, 2:51:01
  31. Lawrence Taylor, 2:51:55
  32. Megan Greszler, 2:52:14
  33. Tim Greszler, 2:52:18
  34. Superflies, 2:52:22
  35. Candace Sabol, 2:54:12
  36. Kim Gluck, 2:56:40
  37. Andy Gluck, 2:56:43
  38. TJ O’Connell, 2:58:12
  39. David Peck, 2:59:17
  40. Nature Trekkers, 3:03:47
  41. Chris Cloutier, 3:06:32
  42. John D’Agostino, 3:06:48
  43. Mike Murrin, 3:09:48
  44. Ryan Paveglio, 3:15:03
  45. Greg Baxter, 3:15:28
  46. Dan Scott, 3:15:40
  47. Aidan Crawford, 3:16:04
  48. Jodi Willey, 3:16:49
  49. Jerrod Widor, 3:17:50
  50. Peter Paveglio, 3:19:26
  51. John Shepard, 3:23:18
  52. Tom Shepard, 3:23:22
  53. Elaine Kelley, 3:25:04
  54. Mystery Riders, 3:28:07
  55. Chris Roy, 3:34:38
  56. Andrew Norkin, 3:51:43
  57. Clarke Beaudry, 3:55:50
  58. Glenny & The Jets, 3:56:51
  59. Denise Taddeo, 4:03:50
  60. Farm Stand Clan, 4:06:36
  61. Kerri Calhoun, 4:14:14
  62. Alissa Towle, 4:36:55
  63. Genanne Brandon, 4:36:57
  64. Julia Peet, 4:57:39
  65. Jeff White, 5:09:47
  66. Chace Conroy, 5:10:26

For full race results, go to the Great Adventure Challenge website at www.maineadventureracing.com

 

 

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