People rally for climate control

IN APRIL 2007 — at the foot of Mount Pleasant, Bridgton resident Sally Chappell and other community members rallied to reduce CO2 levels in the atmosphere. As a show of solidarity for the People’s Climate March in New York City, a couple rallies are being held in the area on Sunday. (Photo courtesy of Sally Chappell)   What: People’s Climate Marches are being held locally; the marches and rallies are happening in conjunction with the People’s Climate Change March in New York City. When: Sunday, Sept. 21, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Where: On the Bay of Naples Bridge on the Causeway in Naples; and also in Bridgton, at the junction of Route 302 and Route 117. Why: To demonstrate to the world’s political leaders the need for policies to reduce carbon emissions and stem the rising temperatures worldwide. On Monday, Sept. 23, the Climate Summit 2014 begins at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City. What to bring: Rally posters and friends For more info: View the film, “Disruption,” online, go to watchdisruption.com

IN APRIL 2007 — at the foot of Mount Pleasant, Bridgton resident Sally Chappell and other community members rallied to reduce CO2 levels in the atmosphere. As a show of solidarity for the People’s Climate March in New York City, a couple rallies are being held in the area on Sunday. (Photo courtesy of Sally Chappell)
What: People’s Climate Marches are being held locally; the marches and rallies are happening in conjunction with the People’s Climate Change March in New York City.
When: Sunday, Sept. 21, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: On the Bay of Naples Bridge on the Causeway in Naples; and also in Bridgton, at the junction of Route 302 and Route 117.
Why: To demonstrate to the world’s political leaders the need for policies to reduce carbon emissions and stem the rising temperatures worldwide. On Monday, Sept. 23, the Climate Summit 2014 begins at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City.
What to bring: Rally posters and friends
For more info: View the film, “Disruption,” online, go to watchdisruption.com

By Dawn De Busk

Staff Writer

Seven years ago, Sally Chappell held a small protest on the causeway below Mount Pleasant in Bridgton.

On the shoulder of Route 302, along with like-minded community members, Chappell rallied for new policies — changes in legislation to reverse climate change, to lower the CO2 particles in the atmosphere.

On Sunday, thousands of Americans will stand shoulder-to-shoulder for a People’s Climate March planned to be held around noon in New York City. Event coordinators have planned a three-mile march along the streets of the city.

On Monday, the Climate Summit begins at the headquarters of the United Nations in New York.

Around the nation and around the world, similar peaceful protests will be held in small towns and big cities.

Two such rallies have been scheduled in the Lake Region: In Bridgton on the corner of Routes 302 and 117, where the streetlight is located; and in Naples, on the Bay of Naples Bridge on the Causeway.

People participating in the New York City march are taking to the streets with a message for U.N. delegates. Everywhere, the rallies are aimed at bringing to the attention of political leaders the importance of preserving life on our planet by changing our consumption of products that create carbon emissions.

People will be protesting for action to be taken by all nations and countries to drastically reduce their carbon emissions and keep the worldwide increase in temperature to 2 degrees Celsius. That means that steps must be put in place, which would allow only a 2-degree rise in worldwide temperatures.

On Sunday night — a week before the people’s march, a group of concerned residents watched the documentary, “Disruption,” which was shown at the Bridgton Community Center.

The documentary, which was released on Sept. 7, can be viewed for free online. The website is watchdisruption.com

After viewing the documentary on Sunday night, some audience members regretted that there were not more people at the public showing. Some audience members regretted that other people from the community were missing this important message — a call for a worldwide change in how society lives so that carbon emissions can begin to be reduced. According to the documentary and according to people at the event, this citizens’ call for the protection of our earth’s atmospheric environment is incredibly time-sensitive.

Bridgton resident Susan Stinchfield said she worries less about herself, and more about her grandchildren when it comes to the future of life on earth.

“It is sad, really, that more people didn’t come to see this,” she said.

“But you can’t preach to the people who aren’t in church,” she said.

“Unless we have a vested interest, an emotional connection” to the results of global warming, “we tend to be able to see it and forget it,” Stinchfield said.

One audience member, Martin Frank, of Denmark, concluded that the march on Sunday won’t be the end-all, the solution to control climate change. It is up to citizens to continue to grab the attention of political leaders and effect change.

“The 21st of September is one event. The problem won’t go away after this march,” Frank said.

He said that with past issues, he would normally suggest writing to politicians.

“It’s disappointing that even politicians can’t do anything. It is up to us,” Frank said.

Despite feeling like writing letters to politicians was a no-result activity, people at Sunday’s documentary did believe there was some merit in voting for politicians with a platform to reduce carbon emissions.

Both Jon and Sally Chappell extended an open invitation to interested Lake Region residents.

“We want to encourage solidarity with the People’s Climate March in New York City and around the world,” they said.

“We don’t need to travel. We don’t need to make a big carbon footprint. We can get our message out there — right here in our hometowns,” Sally said.

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